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Shoulder Injuries

Rotator Cuff injuries

The rotator cuff is a group of four muscles and tendons that help stabilize the shoulder: Supraspinatus, Infraspinatus, Teres minor & Subscapularis. They also aid in movement. Every time you move your shoulder, you are using your rotator cuff to stabilize and help move the joint. The rotator cuff is a commonly injured area. The most common injuries are strains, tendinitis, and bursitis. Read more… 

 

Shoulder impingement

A shoulder impingement syndrome is a condition where the tendons of your rotator cuff muscles become pinched or compressed with certain movements in the shoulder. This, in turn, aggravates and damages the tendons and bursa (a fluid-filled cushion-like structure) which results in pain and inflammation. Some people with shoulder impingements find it difficult to perform daily tasks such as: putting on a seatbelt, getting dressed, raising arms above one’s head or exercising the arms (particularly overhead movements). Read more

Glenohumeral osteoarthritis

Glenohumeral Arthritis occurs in the large shoulder joint where the head of the humerus attaches to the glenoid fossa of the scapula. Stiffness, weakness, and instability commonly accompany this type of degeneration. Read more

Biceps tendinopathy

Biceps tendinopathy is a term used to describe several injuries that can occur in and around the biceps tendon: Biceps Tendinitis – Inflammation of the tendon itself, Biceps Tendinosis – Degeneration of the tendon (non-inflamed), Biceps Tenosynovitis – Inflammation of the tendon sheath, Biceps tendon rupture – This is usually secondary to a preexisting tear or chronic degeneration. The exact cause of a biceps tendinopathy depends on… read more

Calcific tendinopathy

Calcific tendonitis is a common cause of shoulder pain and is characterized by a build-up of calcium in the tendon or muscle of the rotator cuff. The Rotator Cuff is a group of four muscles and tendons that help stabilize the shoulder: Supraspinatus, Infraspinatus, Teres minor & Subscapularis. They also aid in movement: Every time you move your shoulder, you are using your rotator cuff to stabilize and help move the joint. Calcium build-up in the rotator cuff can limit movement in the shoulder as well as cause pain.. Read more

Frozen Shoulder/Adhesive Capsulitis

Frozen shoulder is a condition characterized by stiffness and pain in your shoulder joint. Symptoms usually begin gradually, become worse over time and then resolve, usually within a few years. The risk of developing a frozen shoulder increases if you’re recovering from a medical condition or procedure that prevents you from moving your arm, such as a stroke or shoulder surgery. It’s unusual for a frozen shoulder to recur in the same shoulder, but some people can develop it in the opposite shoulder. Read more

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